Friday, May 6, 2011

Emissions monitor first at GB's NPL

NPL first to deploy new version of Horiba emissions monitor

Kevin Blakley NPL
The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) is the Britain's national measurement institute and is a world-leading centre of excellence in developing and applying the most accurate measurement standards, science and technology available. With a keen interest in technological developments, NPL was the first British organisation to take delivery of the new Horiba PG250 SRM.

NPL's staff provide expert advice on emissions monitor installation, calibration and quality assurance. The organisation's emissions monitoring teams are MCERTS certified and UKAS accredited, which means that they are able to provide services such as the quantification of emissions in accordance with EU Directives, validation of routine continuous emission monitors to BS EN 14181, turbine and burner optimisation, and validation of emission abatement techniques.

The PG250 SRM, from Quantitech, has been used for emissions monitoring work. Employing Standard Reference Methods, it is an upgrade from one of the most popular portable multiparameter continuous emissions monitors in the world.

Kevin Blakley, Project Manager for Emissions Monitoring at NPL, was one of the first to use the PG250 SRM. He says, "The new version includes a Paramagnetic analyser for Oxygen, which is particularly useful because we occasionally use the instrument purely as an Oxygen analyser.

"It also has a tighter measurement range for Carbon Monoxide (0 – 75mg/m3) which has improved accuracy and resolution. NPL has employed the PG250 SRM in a range of emissions monitoring applications, including petrochemical refineries and Kevin says, “We have been very impressed with the flexibility and improved performance of the instrument.”

In March 2011, the monitor was also awarded an MCERTS certificate, verifying that the instrument analyses CO, NOx, SO2, CO2 and O2 to the high standards required by the local Environment Agency.

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